What Keeps Viewers Watching Longer? Engage Video Marketing Podcast With Ben Amos

Dane Golden of HEY.com was on the Engage Video Marketing Podcast with Ben Amos, Episode 103.

TRANSCRIPT

Dane Golden:
This is not television. People have a hundred different distractions they could go to so you have to keep it tight, be valuable all the time. Don’t give away the ending, do steps that are valuable and structured, be helpful, and then at the end, and quickly tell them to watch the next video. That’s the real, it’s not really magic-

Ben Amos:
When it comes to YouTube, too many marketers for too long now have been focused on discoverability or how is their video going to be surfaced by the search algorithms by YouTube? And often, not enough focus is placed on what the video actually contains. And in this episode of the Engage Video Marketing podcast, I’m diving deep with Dane Golden from HEY.com to explore exactly that, what to say in your videos to keep people watching longer. Here we go.

Ben Amos:
This is The Engage Video Marketing podcast, helping you engage your ideal audience to action through online video. I’ll be bringing you the absolute best in the world of video marketing, content creation, storytelling and marketing strategy, as together we grow to dominate online video and build profitable businesses. I’m your host, Ben Amos. Now, let’s get on with the show.

Ben Amos:
Good day, and welcome back to the Engage Video Marketing podcast. This is episode 103 and I’m your host, Ben Amos, from Engage Video Marketing, and I’m really excited that you’re here. Thanks for joining us.

Ben Amos:
So in this episode, we’re continuing YouTube month here on the Engage Video Marketing podcast, as I bring to you our guest today, which is Dane Golden from HEY.com. Now, HEY.com is dedicated to bringing customers more value for their video marketing efforts and they do this through YouTube channel management and optimization services with an eye towards using YouTube as a content marketing platform. My guest today, Dane Golden, also runs marketing for Veeroll, a platform which helps businesses with targeted YouTube ads and remarketing services.

Ben Amos:
If you were listening back in episode 100, Dane actually joined me as one of the featured listeners to the podcast to celebrate 100 episodes of Engaged Video Marketing podcast. So you would have heard a little bit from Dane then, but when I had Dane on for that brief interview for episode 100, we started talking about some concepts around the words that you use within a YouTube video to actually encourage people to watch a video longer or not click off to maximize retention on a video. And it was then that I decided to bring Diane back on the show for a full podcast interview. And that’s exactly what we’re doing today, and it fit right in with YouTube month here in July, 2019.

Ben Amos:
So I’m excited to bring this episode to you because Dane shares some really interesting takes on how people should be approaching YouTube for the purpose growing a business, but also around exactly that, how to create content that people actually want to watch. So let’s dive into this episode with Dane Golden from HEY.com.

Ben Amos:
Hey, Dane, welcome to the show.

Dane Golden:
Hey, Ben Amos, how are you?

Ben Amos:
Oh, I’m doing well. In fact, I should say welcome back to the show because we included you briefly in episode 100 in the Meet Your Listeners episode, so for people who did listen to episode 100, they’ll recognize Dane’s voice, but I had to bring you back on because we touched on some things in that very brief interview a few episodes ago that I knew we needed to dive deeper on here in YouTube month. So looking forward to our chat, Dane. Before we get into it, though, tell our listeners about you and where you come from in the world of video and what you do today.

Dane Golden:
Let me just give a quick thumbnail sketch and if you have more questions you can ask. Sometimes I don’t like to go on and on about my history, but where people generally know me from previously is I was the first employee and later president of a podcast network called Twit or This Week in Tech, run by, it’s owned by Leo Laporte, and he’s a long time tech broadcaster and we had the top shows at the time about tech, about Macs, about Windows, about Google, about open source software, et cetera. And that was a really good project and company. Was very excited to work there and later I went to work for an agency to help them start a YouTube channel for a big tech brand that everyone knows that I won’t say, and we did a great web series. Wow. It was real expensive, it looked great and everything and I feel it didn’t do very well. I felt that the metrics were bad and I was very disappointed in the value that I was providing and I dedicated my professional approach to learning how YouTube works and how it works, particularly for brands.

Dane Golden:
And I’ve done things in influencer marketing and paid media and channel management for brands, which is my main focus. And basically that’s my goal is just to help brands help their customers through helpful how-to videos.

Ben Amos:
Yeah. Cool. So give us the lay of the land of what HEY.com is today. You’re publishing on a few different platforms, YouTube, podcasts, just, you know, what’s the core of what you do here at HEY.com?

Dane Golden:
Right. Yeah. So basically we help businesses manage their YouTube channel and we have an eye towards helpful how-to videos. You can call them tutorials, education, utility. There’s many different names for them, but our approach is simply if you can help more people, you will make more connections. They’ll search and find you and you have an opportunity to make a sale, simply put. We do paid media through our sister company Veeroll, which is partly founded in Australia. You may know them from Gideon Shalwick-

Ben Amos:
Yeah, Gideon Shalwick.

Dane Golden:
… and he’s taken a step back. I’ve taken a step forward and I’m helping them with marketing as well.

Ben Amos:
Fantastic. Awesome. And that’s why you’re the perfect person to bring onto this show to talk about YouTube today. So we’re going to basically dive into particularly how you feel that businesses should be considering and using YouTube as a platform to help grow their core business. So, and I think the thing is that most people recognize when they’re using YouTube for business, their goal is not necessarily to monetize through the YouTube platform, through YouTube ads and typical YouTube kind of approaches. Their goal is to actually just grow and sell more of their core service, their core product. So when you think about that business case use for YouTube, how should businesses be approaching YouTube in 2019 and beyond?

Dane Golden:
I’m going to say something that’s a little controversial. I think businesses on YouTube should give away their expertise until the customer insists on paying them for it.

Ben Amos:
Yeah, love it.

Dane Golden:
Give away their expertise until the customer insists on paying for them, paying for that service. Now what do I mean by that? I mean tactics, not strategies. The small tips that help things going, the strategies, you and I, we’re in a business, everyone listening to this runs a business or is a marketer or something like that. We know if someone asks question number one that there is a question number 12 that we already know the answer to, and our tendency is to say, “Okay, that’s not the right question. You want to know question number 12. Let me just give you the whole thing.” But that’s not what they’re asking for. They’re asking for the first question. And you as a business should respond to that, answer the questions they do have, and say, “By the way, if you want to learn more, there’s this whole umbrella of services we offer and this is one of them.” So in your YouTube videos, as a business, what are people asking if they didn’t know your business existed? Sound right?

Ben Amos:
Yeah, absolutely. And there’s there’s a concept that’s been around and in marketing, particularly digital marketing circles for a while now, around the idea of moving the free line in your business. You know, that idea of particularly when it comes to digital marketing, or just business today, the Internet’s built on a foundation of free. People can find what they want for free, whatever information they want, and as a business, I think what you’re saying here Dane, is you need to be using YouTube as a way of providing that information that people are looking for and giving it away for free so that people know, like, and trust you and therefore want to buy from you. Is that right?

Dane Golden:
Yes, exactly. And you’re right. We’ve conditioned ourselves to believe that with just one search, we can answer any question the world wide. But can we really? We may get some parts of it, but really can we answer that question? What do you think?

Ben Amos:
Yeah, so I mean, look, you just made me think about my kids are five and seven year old kids who just feel that Siri has the answers to everything. Or Google effectively has the answers to everything. And it’s interesting is that sometimes people don’t even know the right questions to ask. Right? So I think by assuming that you know the information that you have to share as a business, the knowledge that you have, is just assuming that people can find that anyway, so that, why should I be sharing that information? I think it’s the wrong way to go about it. I’m not sure if I answered your question or if I took that in a different direction.

Dane Golden:
Well, let me talk about someone’s expertise, right? Each businessperson that’s listening to this has an expertise. Their expertise is actually larger than what they sell. What they sell, I think, is the core, at the center, and the reason that they’re doing this is because, hey, they needed to make some money. But what they know is larger than what they’re selling. And I recommend they talk about what their expertise is, which is larger than what they know.

Dane Golden:
So people are searching for not what you’re selling, but what you know, and because they want to know it and we believe that we can answer it. But in truth, when you ask a level down and you realize, okay, well someone may be able to tell me the answer, but I may not be able to understand it.

Dane Golden:
And in truth, we as customers, particularly in B2B, B2C, doesn’t matter, we don’t actually need to know what you know. I don’t. For instance, I, in my VidCon talk recently, I showed REI, which is a US chain and they’re showing you how to use whatever mosquito bite repellent. Now, I don’t actually need to know what goes in and what percentages. I just need to have faith that they know what it is because I want to outsource that part of my life, that research to this person. They’ve showed me on screen that they know how it works. I trust them. I will give them my business. So I don’t need to know how to do it. I need to know that you know how to do it and you can do it for me.

Ben Amos:
So let’s apply that concept then into YouTube. So how should that, then, inform the content that people are producing and sharing on YouTube for the purpose of growing their business?

Dane Golden:
I can give my example of soccer balls or footballs, right?

Ben Amos:
Yeah.

Dane Golden:
Let’s say we call it soccer in the US, so let’s say I’m selling soccer balls. Now, you can make a very expensive World Cup commercial. People are kicking the balls around and that’s all well and good. I think that’s fantastic. I love to watch those. But you could take a different approach. You could say, “Well, with my soccer ball company, we realize in America that most purchases of soccer balls are by moms and dads. Soccer moms, soccer dads. What do they want to know that’s not about what I’m selling. They might want to know that I have better stitching or better leather or whatever the thing is, or bounce better.” But what they really want to know is how to train their kid, how their kid can be a better athlete, enjoy sports more, learned teammanship, learn drills. Maybe they’re the coach of the team. Maybe they need to know how to have a pizza party after the game with 20 kids.

Dane Golden:
How do you do those types of things? And if you give them those weekly tips on how to do that thing that makes your life better as a soccer mom or soccer dad, well now you’ve become a friend. Now you become a trusted neighbor and when it comes time to buy a soccer ball with the expensive video where people are doing trick shots or the person that’s come into your life every week and helped you, which one are you going to buy?

Ben Amos:
Now, it’s classic content marketing. Like content marketing even from the early days of pre-digital content marketing of soap operas effectively content marketing because they were an advertising vehicle which encouraged people to watch daytime TV and therefore they could get their ads in front of housewives. Right? And they weren’t talking about the cleaning products, the soap that they were trying to sell. They were sharing information that that target audience, that was relevant to them, that was interesting to them. And they positioned their brand alongside that. And I think that’s exactly what you’re saying. Am I right?

Dane Golden:
Exactly. And when we look at the bigger picture, of course, there’s many different types of possible content marketing. There’s entertainment and other pieces like that. But the how-to tips, that’s the basic thing that everyone… You don’t have to be good looking. You don’t have to have a good voice. You don’t have to be young or have hair. Anyone can do it. Anyone knows how to show somebody what they know how to do. And you don’t even have to have a great camera.

Dane Golden:
So what I believe and what I’m espousing is that if you share what you know and help people on video, it can go further than than, say, a blog. Now, you’re doing content marketing here for your business with the podcast, which is another type of content marketing, but let’s compare it with a blog, for instance. Blogcasts can have great information and we do blogs with our company, but 93% of communication is nonverbal. 93%. So it’s really hard to know if you believe someone 100% or have that level of trust without seeing them and having them speak to you, and we say that YouTube is a one to one medium. It looks like it’s one to many. We think it’s one to one because you’re making a direct appeal and relationship to the customer.

Ben Amos:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think that’s so important for creators, whether they be business-minded creators or otherwise, to remember that they’re talking to one person, to get really clear on who that audience is and that’s how people are going to resonate with the content. So I know recently at VidCon, you mentioned it briefly before, you talked about this idea of using tutorial videos. And can you maybe explain a bit more about about what that looks like and how people can… What can you share with us to really understand how people can be more effective in creating this kind of value-based education content like we’re talking about here on YouTube?

Dane Golden:
Well, I’d start by thinking about what are the 20 questions that someone, if they didn’t know your business existed, what would they be searching for? If they didn’t know the name of your business, didn’t know you, maybe didn’t even know your type of business existed, but wanting to know how to do something that you know how to do, what would that be? And then I would look for those, and there’s all sorts of ways to do keyword research with TubeBuddy or VidIQ or MorningFame or other SEO tools. But try to hone in on what you know and what you think you feel comfortable talking about talking about, and that you like talking about, frankly. If you don’t like sharing things and you want to keep all your secrets, hey, stay off of content marketing. Don’t get on video. Do your thing, whatever that is.

Ben Amos:
But let’s assume that they’re not going to do that. So, if we were to unpack, what does that look like? I mean, should people just basically be rolling camera and just teaching? Is that what you’re saying? Like basically, because I think that comes easy to some people, and particularly some services, some business types. It’s a really clear idea of like, “Oh yeah, okay, so I have knowledge, I can tell people about this knowledge.” But have you got any tips to share with us around how do you actually structure or pull that tutorial content together in a way that is going to provide value to the audience and not seem like you’re just trying to flog your product or sell?

Dane Golden:
Right, right, right. Well, we recommend doing 80% of the videos about things you’re not selling and only 20% of the videos about things you are selling. And how should you, the person on camera, think of the people that are watching? Well, we recommend thinking of the people that are watching as a single person, a single viewer. You can think of it as sort of the general customer. Maybe there’s a person who comes into your store or calls your business all the time who’s a good customer, or a bad customer, or they’re always misinformed, or they always have the same question. If you can think of one person, or just the viewer as a single viewer, not viewers, not an audience, I think that that’s a helpful way to go. And you don’t have to think of yourself as being on a set with a lot of great cameras.

Dane Golden:
You’re just talking to one person just like we’re doing now. We’re recording this on Zoom. I’m looking at you, talking to you, and vice versa. It’s a conversation. It’s very normal. We’re sharing information and I think if you approach this, people will feel more comfortable because you will feel more comfortable. And I want to add that we, HEY.com, did a study a couple of years ago with TubeBuddy and we looked at a ton of data and it was a well-done methodology and what we found, our approach was, find if the word you, if you say it in the first five seconds, first 10 seconds, first 30 seconds, if your video will do better, get more views.

Ben Amos:
The word you, yeah.

Dane Golden:
The word you and synonyms like yours, y’all, yourself, you’ll, you’d and so forth. Would it do better? We found a median of 66% more views if you said the word you once in the first five seconds versus videos that didn’t. 30,000 videos we looked at.

Ben Amos:
There you go.

Dane Golden:
Why do we think this is true? Why do you think it’s true?

Ben Amos:
It’s exactly what you were talking about, right? People want to feel that you’re talking to them, and by using those sorts of personal pronouns, I’m not an English teacher, I’m not even sure if pronouns is the right word. You can probably correct me there. Maybe that’s right. Anyway, people can write in. So the using those personal words around you, your in those opening seconds makes it feel like, “Oh, they’ve created this video for me.” Right? So it personalizes it. And so it’s not surprising, but it’s really interesting to hear that data. And, and what did you unpack from that data?

Dane Golden:
Well, I’ll tell you what we believe to be true, because saying a word doesn’t necessarily automatically get you more views, but we attract more views. So what do we believe is happening? Well, what we believe is happening is that because we’re saying, “You,” then people say, “Oh, it’s for me.” And you as a proxy for someone’s name. We don’t know the person that’s watching unless we’re doing a live stream. But as they are watching, the word you says, “Oh, well Dane has created this video for me. Ben’s created this video for me, let’s see what it is.” And thus they watch longer and because they watched longer, the algorithm promotes the video more, getting it more views. That’s what we believe is happening. So people are are taking it personally, taking it to heart, what people are saying. And that’s across many different types of videos.

Ben Amos:
Yeah, it makes sense, right? And I’ve certainly heard the advice spoken about before around, even in the world of podcasting around using that same sort of language. Like when you’re referring to the listener, to that person listening to this show, it’s certainly much more appealing to refer to that as an individual rather than to all the listeners out there. I hear a lot of podcasters using language like that. So yeah, I think that’s awesome. I can see how that directly impacts on the personal connection that a viewer feels there. Have you got more to add from that study or that’s basically what that study encompassed?

Dane Golden:
Well, the reason, and we had a long discussion about this at Social Media Marketing World, if you’ll remember, that I also advocate the people always look directly at the camera in a business video because we’re used to that sort of documentary style where there’s a producer off screen. And since I don’t feel comfortable talking to the camera, I’m looking off screen, but in fact I’m acting as a representative of the company. I’m acting as the number one salesperson right now, and you would never see somebody walk into an office to sell you on something and look over your shoulder. That doesn’t happen. You don’t do that.

Dane Golden:
But anyway, I believe the word you, if you say the word you, you can’t help but want to look at the camera because you’re addressing the customers who you’re actually addressing, or the potential customer, and I think that that’s what people want to do. They want to help their customers or potential customers do something better. I mean, yes, we’re in it for the buck, but we’re also in it to help people in our businesses.

Ben Amos:
I think it’s that layover from traditional broadcast TV. The idea of looking straight down the lens of a camera in traditional broadcast was really, that was the realm of news reporters and the reason why news readers at the desk or reporters would be looking straight down the camera is they’re reporting the facts. They’re talking directly to a viewer effectively and telling them what’s what in the world right now. However, particularly when it comes to documentaries or other interview kind of situations, then they tend to, in a traditional broadcast sense, have the eyes looking off camera because it makes it seem perhaps more authentic and less direct. And I really appreciate that idea when you think about YouTube as a one to one platform, the value of that one to one eye contact with your prospect, with your audience, with your viewer. It really can’t be ignored. So I love that you brought that up. I think that’s really powerful.

Dane Golden:
In American television history, it was always the news anchors that were ranked the most trustworthy on television. There was a great anchor called Walter Cronkite who announced things like the Kennedy assassination and the moon landing, and he was the one that said Vietnam is not going to work. Things like that. What did they do? They looked directly at the camera.

Dane Golden:
Now, there’s some technical ways to get people who aren’t comfortable looking at the camera, and for pros, there’s something called the EyeDirect who I’ve interviewed on my podcast and he’s really interesting. And then there’s ways of using a teleprompter where you connect it to FaceTime. So there’s like a face sitting in there instead of words, things like that.

Ben Amos:
Yeah, that’s awesome. I’ve seen some of those devices use before. Very interesting and worth looking up, particularly for the video producers who are listening. So when we think about the importance of using that personal, direct language and the positioning of the eyeline on camera to hook people in at the start to basically get people in there watching your value-based YouTube videos, to start watching. How can we keep them watching, though? Because, obviously that’s not quite enough just to keep saying you all the time and that kind of thing. So any tips to keep people watching and build on that retention?

Dane Golden:
Okay. Well, yeah, let’s just talk about, let’s start from a more boring analytics way for just a moment. If anyone’s ever looked at their YouTube analytics, their audience retention, it starts usually with this double black diamond ski slope or waterfall, if you like. It just goes straight down. I think of audience retention broken up into four parts. There’s the first part, the middle part, the end, and then there’s also something called relative audience retention. Sorry. So the first part, whether it’s an ad or organic, there’s any drop there is the disconnect between what was in the thumbnail and the title and the topic and what you provided them in those first few seconds. So if you said this is going to be about skateboarding and then you show somebody skiing, there’s going to be a huge drop-off.

Dane Golden:
Likewise, if you said, “We’re giving you something away free,” or whatever the thing is. So whatever’s happening in that title thumbnail, make sure that’s talked about in the first few seconds of the video right off the bat, from second number one. In the middle, well that’s, are you keeping them interested overall, and we’ll talk about those techniques. And then the end, it’s did you say ending words like, “Okay, well, and next week?” Basically, guys like Tim Schmoyer and others have said at the end, give almost no preparation that the video is ending. It’d be a surprise, essentially, other than click on this next video. Don’t even say subscribe, any of that stuff, just get it done.

Ben Amos:
Now, there’s a whole bunch of things you could do at the beginning of the video to keep people on. You can repeat the statement. I even have a lower third on my videos that repeats the title in the first few seconds. They know what the title was, but I’m just saying, “Okay, we’re really talking about this.”

Ben Amos:
You’re in the right place.

Dane Golden:
Yes, and then I talk about it for just a couple seconds and then I show whatever it is, the thing I’m talking about, what we’re ever going to be showing. Do a quick logo branding. I do one to two seconds. You can do as many as five, but don’t spend too much. Then you can do a call to action. “Hey, this is Dane Golden. This is the channel where marketers and business owners learn more about this so you can subscribe.” Then I restate the hook, which was at the beginning. Restate the exact same thing. Show the image again of the finished product.

Dane Golden:
So how do you do this? I recommend steps. Now, people are only going to keep watching if they find value. Like I told somebody, three ways to do a private playlist, for instance. It turned out they were happy with one. So people have a ton of viewership on the first one. They’re like, “Okay, I found it, I’m done.” And that video does well because they watched the first part, but they never made it past one because they just needed a very quick answer.

Dane Golden:
So it’s important to never waste anyone’s time because no one will ever watch a YouTube video for one second more than they want to.

Ben Amos:
Absolutely.

Dane Golden:
This is not television. People have a hundred different distractions they could go to. So you have to keep it tight, be valuable all the time. Don’t give away the ending, do steps that are valuable and structured, be helpful and then at the end, end quickly. Tell them to watch the next video. That’s the real, it’s not really magic. I didn’t invent this. I’ve cobbled this together from a number of people, but this is sort of the established way of getting people to watch a tutorial.

Ben Amos:
Yeah, I love it, and I think what’s critical there is a lot of what you’re talking about there around successful content on YouTube has to do with how you get people to click in the first place. So titles, thumbnails, that sort of thing. But also, then, how you get people to keep watching and it’s not good enough just to have valuable information. I think what you’re talking about there is, it’s also about the language that you use and the way that you structure your content. So you can have the most valuable information, but if you’re not considering how it’s structured and how you’re leading people to keep watching, then you’re potentially going to fail with your content. Right? So how would you sum that up for people? You’ve shared a whole bunch of tips there, but what’s the underlying key thing to have in the back of your mind as you’re creating this kind of value-based tutorial content for a business?

Dane Golden:
The clock’s ticking. The clock is ticking always on every single video and don’t give anyone anything you didn’t promise. Don’t say, “And also, by the way.” I’ve tried this and if I was like, “Oh yeah, and there’s a bonus tip,” they’re like, “Listen, I already got the tips. You gave me what you promised. I’m done.” But our goal really should be, and Tim Schmoyer has promoted this more than anyone, try to have 50% of your audience still on. Not just 50% overall, but 50% still on at the very last thing, because then they can watch the next video and the next and the next. If they cut off halfway, there’s more of a chance to watch someone else’s video or leave altogether. So make the video no longer than someone will watch, and if people aren’t watching your videos or liking them, either you’re not delivering on what you promised or what you promised isn’t what they want. There’s only two options.

Ben Amos:
How would you say that people basically use that value-based tutorial YouTube content they we’re talking about and how do they connect that through to sales? Or do they just rely on if you give enough value, like you said at the outset of this interview, if you give enough value, then someone’s going to want to buy from you. Or is there some steps in between there, like moving people from consuming, devouring your valuable content that answers all their questions on YouTube, through to actually buying from you? How do we connect the dots there?

Dane Golden:
Right, and there’s a tendency for traditional marketers who are running off blogs and websites to say, “Listen, we have to go from each video to a sales page.” Well, sadly on YouTube, what that does is that tells YouTube that people who watch one of your videos do not want to watch any others and that will much lower your ranking, and thus you become a channel that’s entirely driven by paid media or no one’s going to watch.

Dane Golden:
But I’ll repeat what Tim Schmoyer says again, is that the YouTube, and you and I talked about this for paid media at a Social Media Marketing World, about the paid media funnel of video to video to video lower in the funnel. But actually there’s an organic funnel, too. And that is, is that if somebody has watched several of your videos, first of all, that’s made your videos higher ranked in the algorithm, so more people are going to see them. But then by the time they do get maybe to the fourth or fifth video, which might be a sales video, they’ve already essentially gone further down the funnel because they’ve already built that knowledge and that like and that trust about who you are now, and now we’re just debating is your service right for them or not?

Ben Amos:
So having having that call to action, that sales video sporadically spread out through your content strategies is the way to go, right?

Dane Golden:
You can have a, let’s say on the end screen of every video, you can have your checklist, your downloadable checklist that builds your email list, et cetera. But you really only have one verbal CTA at the end of a video, which is usually watch this next video. And usually it’s better even if you can identify what’s in the next video and point to it on screen. But some portion of those people are like, “I’m already sold. Get me the checklist or get me the website.” But that CTA really should be subdued, and every once in a while you can say, “Oh, and by the way, we do offer this service and click here.” But you don’t want to have that on every video. Maybe on every fifth video. And you can have dedicated videos that even are unlisted that are just about sales.

Ben Amos:
It’s the battle, I think, that is it between marketing and sales, that I think good marketing is about value for the customer and sales. Often their focus is on making that conversion happen. But good marketing and sales, particularly when it comes to content marketing, they need to play together nicely. The marketing team and the sales team need to be on the same team to use kind of traditional language around that. So, yeah, I think that’s awesome and really, really good advice there, Dane.

Ben Amos:
Just to wrap up, basically, can I ask you to shout out how people can learn more from you and dive in deeper into what you’ve got going on at HEY.com?

Dane Golden:
Well, I’d love to have people subscribe to my podcast and it’s called the Video Marketing Value podcast, and we cover a lot of great tips from the optimization and content marketing angle on YouTube, and of course don’t forget my YouTube channel, YouTube.com/heycom1.

Ben Amos:
Awesome. I encourage people to go and do that, to go and check you out on YouTube and to and to subscribe to the podcast and we’ll have all the links to that and everything else that we talked about in the show here at EngageVideoMarketing.com/episode103 or 103. Dane, it’s been awesome to have you join us. Again, thanks for coming back on the show after celebrating with us in episode 100 and it’s been an awesome chat. I’m sure there’s been a lot of value shared for our listeners as well.

Dane Golden:
Thank you, Ben Amos, for having me.

Ben Amos:
Yeah and you, Dane. Talk soon, buddy.

Ben Amos:
Thanks again to Dane for joining me on episode 103 of the Engage Video Marketing podcast. Dane, I know you’re listening to this show, so I appreciate you once again for your time and insight on the show.

Ben Amos:
So what did you guys think? I’d love for you to reach out and let me know on Twitter@Engage_Ben or Instagram@ engage_Ben as well. Thanks for joining me for this episode and if you get any value out of this podcast at all, I would love for you to hit that subscribe button so that you get each new episode each Tuesday as it drops, but also to leave me a rating and a review for this podcast. It’s been a little while since we’ve had some fresh ratings and reviews for this show, so I would really appreciate if you’ve listened for a while or if this is your first episode and you’ve got value from this, I would love for you to jump on in right now and leave me that honest rating and a review. I really appreciate you very much for doing that.

Ben Amos:
Now, even though we’re coming to the end of July, 2019, which I’ve titled YouTube month here on the podcast, I’m actually going to be bringing you one more YouTube-based interview next week, and my guest next week is YouTube guru Nick Neiman, and we’ve already recorded this interview and I can tell you you will want to listen next week as it was a fantastic interview, which I was really excited to do. So make sure you hit that subscribe button and I can’t wait to be back with you next week here on the Engage Video Marketing podcast. Have an awesome week.

Ben Amos:
Hey, Ben here. I just want to take a moment to help you out with something. If you, like many of the Engage Video Marketing podcasts listeners, are looking for ways to do video for your business getter, then keep listening. I’ve put together a free foundations video course designed to help you better understand the fundamentals of effective online video strategy for your brand or business. The three-part video series will step you through the roadmap to ensuring you know what videos to make and why, so you can get started the right way with video for your business. To jump in right now for free, head on over to EngageVideoMarketing.com/foundations. I can’t wait to see you there.

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